Forest Therapy Guide Training

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Ohio - Cohort 29

Jouvence Lodge in Winter

Weeklong Intensive 8 - 15 Sept 2018 | Practicum Ends15 Mar 2019
Forest Therapy Guide Training
|
Ohio - Cohort 29

"One of the last great places on Earth." - The Nature Conservancy

Who should attend
About the Venue:

Oak Openings Ohio

"One of the last great places on Earth." - The Nature Conservancy

Located between Whitehouse and Swanton, Oak Openings Preserve takes its name from the surrounding region, which is 23 times larger than the park itself. That’s something to consider when you discover that Oak Openings Preserve is about 5,000 acres. Pioneers trudging through a dense swamp called this area “Oak Openings.” Most of the park is an oak savanna ecosystem, characterized by alternating wetlands and vegetated dunes. The Nature Conservancy once named the sandy region one of the 200 “Last Great Places on Earth.” At the preserve grow prickly-pear cactus, wild lupine, and sand cherry bloom atop sand dunes just yards away from orchids in low, wet swales. There are more than 50 miles of trails in Oak Openings Preserve. Stands of isolated pine and spruce planted by the WPA during the Great Depression are still visible. The preserve is also a birder's paradise. It is the nesting place of bluebirds, indigo buntings, whippoorwills, lark sparrows and many other species, as well as an excellent location to see migrating songbirds in the spring.

Lodging

Where to stay:

Campgrounds are available in or near the park, and many hotels are available in the area.  Note that at some campgrounds there are no shower facilities.

Meals

Meals:

Participants will prepare their own meals. There is a large kitchen on-site that will be available for our group, including stoves, cookware, and refrigerators. There are restaurants and grocery stores within a 15-minute drive.

Transportation

Transportation:

No transportation modes are offered. Guests must arrange their own transport.

Tuition

Tuition for the six-month Guide Training and Certification Program is $3410 USD. This includes the week-long intensive training and six months of mentored practicum. It does not include travel, lodging, ground transportation, or meals. 

Christy trained with Cohort 6 in 2016 in the Berkshire Mountains of Massachusetts. She is a facilitator of ANFT immersions, trainer and mentor. She was born and raised in the farmlands of Indiana, where she now resides with her 4 children and husband. She is a violinist, vocalist and teacher by training and vocation. She administers a music school in her small town through the local YMCA. Christy lives amongst the fields of corn, wheat, soybeans and wooded lots on a small hobby farm where she has planted vegetable gardens, berries, fruit trees, and the many memories of her children’s lives. Her work with ANFT has been life-changing and the source of so much of her energy and vitality. She is currently finishing a degree in Environmental Science and Religious Studies, which is in part the result of her training and also a source for even more love and connection to her forest therapy practice.

Ronna Schneberger has been a professional award winning naturalist, interpreter, and hiking guide in the Canadian Mountain Parks for 25 years. She is a yoga teacher of 20 years and in the last decade incorporated yoga, meditation, and coaching in nature.  The results were profound.  In her quest to understand why time in nature easily creates powerful experiences, she became a Forest Therapy Guide with the ANFT, one of the first in Canada.  Ronna is a trainer and mentor for forest therapy guides. She is faculty with Leadership Development at the Banff Centre where she works with leaders, professionals and executives from all over the world using nature as the teacher to create powerful reflections and transformation. She is the Chair of the ANFT Canadian Council, along with her team; she looks forward to promoting Forest Therapy in Canada.

Forest Therapy Guide Training

|

Ohio - Cohort 29

Jouvence Lodge in Winter

Weeklong Intensive 8 - 15 Sept 2018 | Practicum Ends15 Mar 2019
Ohio - Cohort 29
|

"One of the last great places on Earth." - The Nature Conservancy

Located between Whitehouse and Swanton, Oak Openings Preserve takes its name from the surrounding region, which is 23 times larger than the park itself. That’s something to consider when you discover that Oak Openings Preserve is about 5,000 acres. Pioneers trudging through a dense swamp called this area “Oak Openings.” Most of the park is an oak savanna ecosystem, characterized by alternating wetlands and vegetated dunes. The Nature Conservancy once named the sandy region one of the 200 “Last Great Places on Earth.” At the preserve grow prickly-pear cactus, wild lupine, and sand cherry bloom atop sand dunes just yards away from orchids in low, wet swales. There are more than 50 miles of trails in Oak Openings Preserve. Stands of isolated pine and spruce planted by the WPA during the Great Depression are still visible. The preserve is also a birder's paradise. It is the nesting place of bluebirds, indigo buntings, whippoorwills, lark sparrows and many other species, as well as an excellent location to see migrating songbirds in the spring.

Who should attend
About the Venue:

Oak Openings Ohio

"One of the last great places on Earth." - The Nature Conservancy

Located between Whitehouse and Swanton, Oak Openings Preserve takes its name from the surrounding region, which is 23 times larger than the park itself. That’s something to consider when you discover that Oak Openings Preserve is about 5,000 acres. Pioneers trudging through a dense swamp called this area “Oak Openings.” Most of the park is an oak savanna ecosystem, characterized by alternating wetlands and vegetated dunes. The Nature Conservancy once named the sandy region one of the 200 “Last Great Places on Earth.” At the preserve grow prickly-pear cactus, wild lupine, and sand cherry bloom atop sand dunes just yards away from orchids in low, wet swales. There are more than 50 miles of trails in Oak Openings Preserve. Stands of isolated pine and spruce planted by the WPA during the Great Depression are still visible. The preserve is also a birder's paradise. It is the nesting place of bluebirds, indigo buntings, whippoorwills, lark sparrows and many other species, as well as an excellent location to see migrating songbirds in the spring.

Lodging

Where to stay:

Campgrounds are available in or near the park, and many hotels are available in the area.  Note that at some campgrounds there are no shower facilities.

Meals

Meals:

Participants will prepare their own meals. There is a large kitchen on-site that will be available for our group, including stoves, cookware, and refrigerators. There are restaurants and grocery stores within a 15-minute drive.

Transportation

Transportation:

No transportation modes are offered. Guests must arrange their own transport.

Christy trained with Cohort 6 in 2016 in the Berkshire Mountains of Massachusetts. She is a facilitator of ANFT immersions, trainer and mentor. She was born and raised in the farmlands of Indiana, where she now resides with her 4 children and husband. She is a violinist, vocalist and teacher by training and vocation. She administers a music school in her small town through the local YMCA. Christy lives amongst the fields of corn, wheat, soybeans and wooded lots on a small hobby farm where she has planted vegetable gardens, berries, fruit trees, and the many memories of her children’s lives. Her work with ANFT has been life-changing and the source of so much of her energy and vitality. She is currently finishing a degree in Environmental Science and Religious Studies, which is in part the result of her training and also a source for even more love and connection to her forest therapy practice.

Ronna Schneberger has been a professional award winning naturalist, interpreter, and hiking guide in the Canadian Mountain Parks for 25 years. She is a yoga teacher of 20 years and in the last decade incorporated yoga, meditation, and coaching in nature.  The results were profound.  In her quest to understand why time in nature easily creates powerful experiences, she became a Forest Therapy Guide with the ANFT, one of the first in Canada.  Ronna is a trainer and mentor for forest therapy guides. She is faculty with Leadership Development at the Banff Centre where she works with leaders, professionals and executives from all over the world using nature as the teacher to create powerful reflections and transformation. She is the Chair of the ANFT Canadian Council, along with her team; she looks forward to promoting Forest Therapy in Canada.

Forest Therapy Guide Training

|

Ohio - Cohort 29

Jouvence Lodge in Winter
Weeklong Intensive 8 - 15 Sept 2018 | Practicum Ends15 Mar 2019
Ohio - Cohort 29
|
Swanton, Ohio

"One of the last great places on Earth." - The Nature Conservancy

Located between Whitehouse and Swanton, Oak Openings Preserve takes its name from the surrounding region, which is 23 times larger than the park itself. That’s something to consider when you discover that Oak Openings Preserve is about 5,000 acres. Pioneers trudging through a dense swamp called this area “Oak Openings.” Most of the park is an oak savanna ecosystem, characterized by alternating wetlands and vegetated dunes. The Nature Conservancy once named the sandy region one of the 200 “Last Great Places on Earth.” At the preserve grow prickly-pear cactus, wild lupine, and sand cherry bloom atop sand dunes just yards away from orchids in low, wet swales. There are more than 50 miles of trails in Oak Openings Preserve. Stands of isolated pine and spruce planted by the WPA during the Great Depression are still visible. The preserve is also a birder's paradise. It is the nesting place of bluebirds, indigo buntings, whippoorwills, lark sparrows and many other species, as well as an excellent location to see migrating songbirds in the spring.

Tuition for the six-month Guide Training and Certification Program is $3410 USD. This includes the week-long intensive training and six months of mentored practicum. It does not include travel, lodging, ground transportation, or meals. 

About the Venue:

Oak Openings Ohio

"One of the last great places on Earth." - The Nature Conservancy

Located between Whitehouse and Swanton, Oak Openings Preserve takes its name from the surrounding region, which is 23 times larger than the park itself. That’s something to consider when you discover that Oak Openings Preserve is about 5,000 acres. Pioneers trudging through a dense swamp called this area “Oak Openings.” Most of the park is an oak savanna ecosystem, characterized by alternating wetlands and vegetated dunes. The Nature Conservancy once named the sandy region one of the 200 “Last Great Places on Earth.” At the preserve grow prickly-pear cactus, wild lupine, and sand cherry bloom atop sand dunes just yards away from orchids in low, wet swales. There are more than 50 miles of trails in Oak Openings Preserve. Stands of isolated pine and spruce planted by the WPA during the Great Depression are still visible. The preserve is also a birder's paradise. It is the nesting place of bluebirds, indigo buntings, whippoorwills, lark sparrows and many other species, as well as an excellent location to see migrating songbirds in the spring.

Lodging

Where to stay:

Campgrounds are available in or near the park, and many hotels are available in the area.  Note that at some campgrounds there are no shower facilities.

Meals

Meals:

Participants will prepare their own meals. There is a large kitchen on-site that will be available for our group, including stoves, cookware, and refrigerators. There are restaurants and grocery stores within a 15-minute drive.

Transportation

Transportation:

No transportation modes are offered. Guests must arrange their own transport.

Christy trained with Cohort 6 in 2016 in the Berkshire Mountains of Massachusetts. She is a facilitator of ANFT immersions, trainer and mentor. She was born and raised in the farmlands of Indiana, where she now resides with her 4 children and husband. She is a violinist, vocalist and teacher by training and vocation. She administers a music school in her small town through the local YMCA. Christy lives amongst the fields of corn, wheat, soybeans and wooded lots on a small hobby farm where she has planted vegetable gardens, berries, fruit trees, and the many memories of her children’s lives. Her work with ANFT has been life-changing and the source of so much of her energy and vitality. She is currently finishing a degree in Environmental Science and Religious Studies, which is in part the result of her training and also a source for even more love and connection to her forest therapy practice.

Ronna Schneberger has been a professional award winning naturalist, interpreter, and hiking guide in the Canadian Mountain Parks for 25 years. She is a yoga teacher of 20 years and in the last decade incorporated yoga, meditation, and coaching in nature.  The results were profound.  In her quest to understand why time in nature easily creates powerful experiences, she became a Forest Therapy Guide with the ANFT, one of the first in Canada.  Ronna is a trainer and mentor for forest therapy guides. She is faculty with Leadership Development at the Banff Centre where she works with leaders, professionals and executives from all over the world using nature as the teacher to create powerful reflections and transformation. She is the Chair of the ANFT Canadian Council, along with her team; she looks forward to promoting Forest Therapy in Canada.