Forest Therapy Guide Training

|

California - Cohort 28

Jouvence Lodge in Winter

Weeklong Intensive 11-18 Aug 2018 | Practicum Ends 18 Feb 2019
Sugarloaf Ridge State Park
|
Kenwood, California

In the fields and forests of Wine Country...

Who should attend
Schedule Overview

Join us on 3,900 acres of oak woodlands, Coastal Redwood groves, and more at one of the most beautiful parks in Northern California. Sugarloaf Ridge State Park is our home site for researching and leading Shinrin-Yoku and forest therapy walks We are intimately familiar with the landscape, the trails, and the bioregion. ​Participants will also experience Quarry Hill Botanical Gardens. Quarry Hill is one of the pre-eminent Asian botanical gardens globally, featuring one of the largest collections of documented, wild-collected Asian plants in the world. It is place of delightful discovery, with each bend in the trail bringing new surprises. 

About the Venue:

Sugarloaf Ridge State Park

An amazing natural haven of 3,900 acres in Kenwood, California. Sugarloaf Ridge State Park is located northeast of Kenwood in the Mayacamas Mountains between the Sonoma and Napa valleys. A favorite park for families, Sugarloaf boasts a variety of activities with stunning vistas and amazing scenery. Key features of the park include:

Best views overlooking the North Bay with vistas to San Francisco, Napa Valley, Mt. St Helena and the Sierras on clear days!Year-round campground with 47 sites, each with a table and fire ring. Bathrooms have hot showers and separate group camping!Over 25 miles of hiking trails. From an easy 1-mile nature trail to a challenging 8.2-mile loop over Bald Mountain.Spectacular wildflower displays in the early to late spring and early summer.Robert Ferguson Observatory, which houses a 40″ telescope and offers public viewings throughout the year. It’s the largest observatory dedicated solely to public viewing and education.Great mountain biking and horseback riding accessible trails.Headwaters to Sonoma Creek, Sugarloaf boasts a 25-foot waterfall after the winter rains.Visitor Center with park historic information and a gift shop.Diverse beauty – Sugarloaf runs through gorge and canyon, across the meadow floor, beneath scenic rock outcroppings, and is surrounded at times by redwoods and ferns.Wildlife spotting – deer, gray foxes, the occasional bobcat and coyote can be seen in the park.

Accommodations:  We’ll be tent camping within a campground with modern bathrooms and coin-operated showers. Participants are responsible for bringing their own camping gear. Contact us if you need information for nearby rental resources. If you have your own car, it is possible to stay off-site in hotels or bed and breakfast lodging in the towns of Kenwood, Sonoma, or Santa Rosa. We have reserved three campsites that our group will share, so ou do not need to contact Sugarloaf Ridge to make campground reservations. Sugarloaf Ridge State Park is a camping venue; campground and parking fees are not included in the registration fee. We will collect a fee of $90 from each participant who stays at the campground at the time of the training.

Lodging
Transportation
Meals
Tuition

Tuition for the six-month Guide Training and Certification Program is $3410 USD. This includes the week-long intensive training and six months of mentored practicum. It does not include travel, lodging, ground transportation, or meals.

About the Venue:

Sugarloaf Ridge State Park

Ben ‘Crow’ Page is the Director of Training for the Association of Nature and Forest Therapy as well as a trainer of guides. He is the founder of Shinrin Yoku LA and has been guiding Forest Therapy walks since 2016. Since his practice began, Ben has been featured in such publications as Women’s Health, USA TODAY, Good Morning America, The Washington Post, and WebMD. Ben is also a co-founder of The Open School, Southern California’s only free democratic school. He holds a B.A. in religious studies from Carleton College and an M.A. in human development and social change from Pacific Oaks College. Ben’s primary interest is to live the question of what it means to be alive.

Carolynne Crawley is a Mi'kmaw woman with mixed ancestry from the East Coast. She is dedicated to social and environmental justice and supporting Indigenous led community work related to food sovereignty and food security.  Carolynne has worked with one of Canada’s largest food security organizations for the past decade.  She was the Indigenous Food Access Manager.  During her time as the IFA Manager, she worked with remote communities along the James Bay to support the increase of access to affordable and healthy foods, developed a cross cultural youth program focusing upon the Indigenous way of being in relationship with land, and organized a province wide Indigenous Food Sovereignty Gathering that included ceremonies and networking opportunities.  In a previous role, she built school food gardens, created and facilitated curriculum -linked food literacy programs for both students and teachers.

Carolynne is passionate about connecting people with the land, themselves, and with each other.  She leads workshops in relationship building to develop and strengthen  healthy, reciprocal relationships based upon Indigenous teachings that decolonize existing interactions with the land.   She is also a Forest Therapy Trainer and Mentor.  She leads trainings world-wide.  She is also a Registered Holistic Nutritionist.  On occasion she offers workshops focusing upon healthy eating on a budget.  Previously, Carolynne has worked, as a Child & Youth Worker for two decades supporting people with developmental and mental health needs.


Carolynne is in the process of launching her new business, in early 2019, Msit Nokmaq which translates to All of My Relations in Mi’kmaw.  She has had the pleasure of working with universities and colleges to create opportunities for students to deepen their understanding of food security and food sovereignty, along with connecting with the land.  Currently, Carolynne works as an Independent Contractor, Consultant, and Public Speaker.

Christy is a Certified Forest Therapy Guide and Mentor. Her forest therapy practice works primarily through local organizations: counseling services, local and state parks, and ACRES landtrust. Indiana's beautiful deciduous forests are wonderful, all four seasons. She also guides walks for the Western Dupage Special Recreation Association. She is currently in school studying Environmental Science, with a minor in Religious Studies. Besides her interest in indigenous people's use of plant medicine and the translation of that in to modern herbal medicine, Christy is deeply involved in a personal inquiry around the intersection of faith traditions and forest therapy, and she leads quarterly discussions with guides on this topic. She is the music program director for the local YMCA, a violinist and vocalist. She finds her quiet time in the outdoors to take the star role in her self-care.

Since childhood, Caitlin has been driven by her deep desire to live a life close to the earth and in service to the health of all life.  She offers forest-bathing walks as an opportunity for people to develop an intimate relationship with the land and to connect to the innate processes that bring health and wellness to us as organisms.  She knows our health is intimately tied to the health of the land and visa versa.  It is her intention that this work lead to tender relationships with nature that bring greater health and vitality to individuals and invoke greater stewardship and commitment to the healthy regeneration of our world.  As a guide Caitlin brings joy, grace, loving compassion and a deep sense of beauty and presence.  She is dedicated to the future generations and leaving them a healthy, happy, thriving world.

As a certified nature and forest therapy guide with the Association of Nature and Forest Therapy Guides and Programs, Jackie loves guiding people for an immersive experience in Nature. She also loves teaching others how to make certain Chinese food, including dumplings. So she combined her two passions and launched a successful AirBnB Experience called “Forest Bathing with Jiazi Dumplings” in the spring of 2018. Born and raised in rural China, Jackie spent a lot of time outdoors as a child, helping her grandmother gather firewood and following her grandfather around as he raised buffaloes. She came to the United States as a PhD candidate in 1990 and made Los Angeles her home after completing her studies. Besides leading forest therapy walks, Jackie also does translation work and advocates for her autistic son Chris.